Deducting your donations to As-Sahabah Cultural Association (A 501c3 non-profit charitable organization) from your Tax:

 

If you have contributed to As-Sahabah, and single (each) contribution amount was less than $250, the following applies to you:

 

If you have contributed to As-Sahabah, and single (each) contribution amount was more than $250, the following applies to you:

 

Where to deduct?

 

When to Deduct/Which year tax can I apply the deduction?

 

Time of making contribution?

 

Deduction limits:

 

Above requirements were deduced from the following IRS documentations. Please review them and let us know of any needed corrections:

 

http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p1771.pdf

 

http://www.stayexempt.org/mini-courses/canIDeduc/player.html

 

Everything you need to know about your deductions is in the following link. Only those points added above are those pertaining to majority of As-Sahabah donors.

http://www.irs.gov/publications/p526/ar02.html#d0e3872

Following are some extract from above link:

Cash Contributions

Cash contributions include those paid by cash, check, electronic funds transfer, credit card, or payroll deduction.

You cannot deduct a cash contribution, regardless of the amount, unless you keep one of the following.

1.      A bank record that shows the name of the qualified organization, the date of the contribution, and the amount of the contribution. Bank records may include:

a.       A canceled check,

b.      A bank or credit union statement, or

c.       A credit card statement.

2.      A receipt (or a letter or other written communication) from the qualified organization showing the name of the organization, the date of the contribution, and the amount of the contribution.

3.      The payroll deduction records described next.

Payroll deductions.   If you make a contribution by payroll deduction, you must keep:

1.      A pay stub, Form W-2, or other document furnished by your employer that shows the date and amount of the contribution, and

2.      A pledge card or other document prepared by or for the qualified organization that shows the name of the organization.

If your employer withheld $250 or more from a single paycheck, see Contributions of $250 or More, next.

Contributions of $250 or More

You can claim a deduction for a contribution of $250 or more only if you have an acknowledgment of your contribution from the qualified organization or certain payroll deduction records.

If you made more than one contribution of $250 or more, you must have either a separate acknowledgment for each or one acknowledgment that lists each contribution and the date of each contribution and shows your total contributions.

Amount of contribution.   

In figuring whether your contribution is $250 or more, do not combine separate contributions. For example, if you gave your church $25 each week, your weekly payments do not have to be combined. Each payment is a separate contribution.

  If contributions are made by payroll deduction, the deduction from each paycheck is treated as a separate contribution.

  If you made a payment that is partly for goods and services, as described earlier under Contributions From Which You Benefit, your contribution is the amount of the payment that is more than the value of the goods and services.

Acknowledgment.   The acknowledgment must meet these tests.

1.      It must be written.

2.      It must include:

a.       The amount of cash you contributed,

b.      Whether the qualified organization gave you any goods or services as a result of your contribution (other than certain token items and membership benefits),

c.       A description and good faith estimate of the value of any goods or services described in (b) (other than intangible religious benefits), and

d.      A statement that the only benefit you received was an intangible religious benefit, if that was the case. The acknowledgment does not need to describe or estimate the value of an intangible religious benefit. An intangible religious benefit is a benefit that generally is not sold in commercial transactions outside a donative (gift) context. An example is admission to a religious ceremony.

3.      You must get it on or before the earlier of:

a.       The date you file your return for the year you make the contribution, or

b.      The due date, including extensions, for filing the return.

  If the acknowledgment does not show the date of the contribution, you must also have a bank record or receipt, as described earlier, that does show the date of the contribution. If the acknowledgment does show the date of the contribution and meets the other tests just described, you do not need any other records.

Payroll deductions.   If you make a contribution by payroll deduction and your employer withheld $250 or more from a single paycheck, you must keep:

1.      A pay stub, Form W-2, or other document furnished by your employer that shows the amount withheld as a contribution, and

2.      A pledge card or other document prepared by or for the qualified organization that shows the name of the organization and states the organization does not provide goods or services in return for any contribution made to it by payroll deduction.

A single pledge card may be kept for all contributions made by payroll deduction regardless of amount as long as it contains all the required information.

  If the pay stub, Form W-2, pledge card, or other document does not show the date of the contribution, you must also have another document that does show the date of the contribution. If the pay stub, Form W-2, pledge card, or other document does show the date of the contribution, you do not need any other records except those just described in (1) and (2).

Noncash Contributions

For a contribution not made in cash, the records you must keep depend on whether your deduction for the contribution is:

1.      Less than $250,

2.      At least $250 but not more than $500,

3.      Over $500 but not more than $5,000, or

4.      Over $5,000.

Amount of deduction.   In figuring whether your deduction is $500 or more, combine your claimed deductions for all similar items of property donated to any charitable organization during the year.

  If you got goods or services in return, as described earlier in Contributions From Which You Benefit, reduce your contribution by the value of those goods or services. If you figure your deduction by reducing the fair market value of the donated property by its appreciation, as described earlier in Giving Property That Has Increased in Value, your contribution is the reduced amount.

Deductions of Less Than $250

If you make any noncash contribution, you must get and keep a receipt from the charitable organization showing:

1.      The name of the charitable organization,

2.      The date and location of the charitable contribution, and

3.      A reasonably detailed description of the property.

A letter or other written communication from the charitable organization acknowledging receipt of the contribution and containing the information in (1), (2), and (3) will serve as a receipt.

You are not required to have a receipt where it is impractical to get one (for example, if you leave property at a charity's unattended drop site).